Culture Change and Rebalancing Studies

“Culture Change” “Rebalancing” “balancing”, “redesign” and “Money Follows the Person” are current buzz words; a reflection of the constant pressure from consumers, providers and elected officials to improve programs. However, actually improving programs is difficult. Successful improvement entails a through understanding of what the current program is, choices for changing it, and an idea of how consumers and providers will react to the changes. Dr. Hendrickson knows what balanced long-term care programs look like because of his multi-state research, and administrative responsibilities for Oregon and New Jersey long-term care programs. Good consulting can help you improve the balance in your long-term care programs by examining what you have and suggesting ways to improve and strengthen programs Hendrickson Development has:

  • In 2013, worked on study of South Carolina developmental disabilities programs and made suggestions for improving them
  • In 2009, was project manager for team that reviewed culture change reimbursement policies used by Colorado.
  • In 2009 coauthored 300-page report on rebalancing California long term care programs.
  • In 2008, evaluated Pennsylvania’s nursing home transition program.
  • In 2007, helped West Virginia with a Rebalancing and Money Follows the Person review of its aged, disabled, mental retardation and developmentally disabled programs.
  • In 2006, as a subcontractor with the Public Consulting Group, helped Alaska redesign its long-term care programs and helped West Virginia redesign its mental health, substance abuse and MR/DD programs.
  • In 2006, reported on the cost effectiveness of nursing facility transition programs, for this report see http://www.hcbs.org/files/97/4838/MFPCostEffectivenessFinal090506.pdf
  • In 2005, reported on states that use global budgeting procedures in their long-term care program, for this report see http://www.hcbs.org/files/52/2598/Globalbudgeting.doc
  • In 2005, as a subcontractor with the National Academy for State Health Policy, helped Oklahoma redesign its long-term care programs.